ABOUT Kishimoto LAB.

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Particle and nuclear spectroscopy.

Research of our laboratory is based on particle and nuclear spectroscopy.
In addition to leptons as elementary particles, atomic nuclei and hadrons are the most basic particles of the matter which are available in our research. Spectroscopy is a process by which waves of light are separated according to their wavelengths, in the same way as the colors are divided in a prism or rainbow. Quantum mechanics developed during the 20th century tells that light is also a particle and thus has energy. At the same time a particles is also wave and thus has wavelength. The measurement of particle energy is also spectroscopy. We study origin of matter in the universe by particle and nuclear spectroscopy. In order to carry out this study, knowledge of physics and advanced experimental techniques are needed.

The fundamentals of our research is physics. Some of them that we believe important are the following.

1. The research is interesting.
The largest motivation to study physics resides in its interest. Physics is the most fundamental of all the natural sciences, and it has very small number of basic principles. However, it is quite difficult to have understanding of these principles by relating phenomena that occur in the real world. Therefore, when we get an understanding of a phenomenon based on a principle, we experience an incomparable sense of interest and wonder. Experiments, studies, seminars, and discussions in daily research life lead us to discoveries that explain how things work. They are tiny but new to each person. The potential of discoveries becomes higher to persons who develops the habit of always questioning on anything that they do not understand. These experiences are all signposts on the road to major discoveries.

2. The research requires substantial work.
Although the principles of physics are simple, it takes much time to understand their meanings and gain a true feel for them. Therefore the research requires substantial work. In physics as a natural science, verification by experiments is vital. Considerable time has to be devoted to learn physics and technique required to carry out such experiments. This can often be a very frustrating time, and substantial effort is needed to overcome these experimental challenges.

3. Think for yourself.
This applies to more than just physics, however it is extremely important to think for yourself when conducting research. Individual thinking is the force that will open up the paths to the new research. We often are told that a certain subject is interesting. It may be good to feel that it is interesting when you hear it for the first time, however it becomes necessary to sort things out and decide on your own whether or not it is truly interesting. Discovery is only possible when you think using your own mind. Being critical helps to weed out research that is not substantively important, and becomes a force that propels research which is truly interesting and presumabley precious.

4. English is the official language.
All of us live in a world of time limits. If you are a student, you must write thesis, earn credits, and find work. If you are a researcher, you must organize your work, present your results, write a paper, and then proceed to the next step. Although not every one of these processes will go smoothly, we (staff member) share a responsibility to proceed to the next step more or less according to schedule.

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Kishimoto Lab. Osaka University, Graduate school of Science
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Kishimoto Lab. Osaka University, Graduate school of Science
tel:+81-6-6850-5378 fax:+81-6-6850-5530 Building H, Room# H404 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka City, Osaka 560-0043, Japan
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